Long Poems

Earth

I felt like trying out something new, so why not a sonnet? They are very complicated though, and you need exactly ten syllables per stanza, and an ABAB CDCD EFEF GG rhyme scheme. Beware: it’s kind of dark. (The second poem isn’t a sonnet, it’s free verse.)


A girl fights the wind of an icy storm.

Her cracked, ice-covered face is turning blue.

Her billowing cape is so ripped and torn,

it is dirt-crusted, threadbare, and not new.

She dreams of her house, of her clothes and comb

as the wind relentlessly pelts her hard.

She wishes that she could get back home,

and to this, she would prefer getting charred.

And then in the storm’s one last daring feat,

her dusty cloak is stolen by the sky.

She is broken, but it’s not her defeat,

her body drops to the ground, her eyes dry.

She thinks to herself, This is not the end.

I’m determined, I’ll eventually mend.


In a world of darkness, where is the light?

In a world of wrong, where is the right?

In a world of no melody, where is the song?

In a world of short messages, where are the long?

In a world of confusion, where are the solutions?

In a world that should be clean, why is there pollution?

In a world of wars, where is the peace?

In a world that should be rising, why do we decrease?

In a world where some are wealthy, why do those take gems?

In a world where the piles of bad are growing,

why do you add to them?


Thanks for reading!

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Review of books one and two in “The Unwanteds Quests” series, by Lisa McMann

The Unwanteds Quests

This is the sequel series to “The Unwanteds,” and I found the first two books to be disappointing.

***THE FOLLOWING CONTAINS MAJOR SPOILERS FOR “THE UNWANTEDS” SERIES.***

Books one and two of “The Unwanteds Quests” are in the perspective of Alex and Aaron’s younger twin sisters, Fifer and Thisbe.

Fifer and Thisbe are desperate to learn magic, as they are easily the most powerful mages in Artimé, having killed Captain Baldhead in Artimé’s final battle and destroying the silence spell on Warbler Island.

But Alex forbids them to learn, because it’s “dangerous.” They get into all sorts of trouble performing spells they shouldn’t know and sneaking out of the mansion.

Then one day, bad news arrives. Hux, the ice-blue dragon, returns to Artimé, requesting new wings for him and his siblings. The problem is, he needs them because they are enslaved and need them to do work.

Is this Fifer and Thisbe’s chance to finally use the magic they’ve been dreaming of? Find out by reading “The Unwanteds Quests.”

Rating: 2.5/5 stars. These books were depressing, with poor Alex and his unusable dominant arm. I think this was the main reason the series focused more on Thisbe and Fifer, and not Alex, because Alex can’t even do magic anymore. Some people die in the series (sorry for the slight spoiler there), so overall, not the happiest books. If you’re looking for a book or two that’ll cheer you up, this is not the place to go. Also, I found that the series was very slow, and does not speed up until halfway through the second book. I found myself zoning out many times, having to backtrack a page or so every time. (And that rarely happens with me!) There were a couple other issues I found with the series, but I couldn’t tell you without ruining the books!

Ages: 11-14

***THE SPOILERS END HERE.***

I do not recommend the first two books in “The Unwanteds Quests” series unless you read “The Unwanteds” series first. (I tried once and I only got a couple chapters in!) Also, if you dislike sad books, do not read them. However, if you can’t wait to know what happens next, go ahead!

The Girl Who Could Unite Them All, Part Three

Vali gasped and grabbed her hair. Sure enough, it was a deep violet tone.

“Valerine!” her father shouted from the audience. He came running all the way up the stairs. He grabbed her shoulders. “Test your powers.”

“How?” Vali asked, panicked.

“Just concentrate on your powers coming out of your hands.”

Her father showed her, a blaze shooting from his hand.

Vali concentrated, and then . . .

Water and fire simultaneously shot from her hands. Gusts of wind poured out of her and shook the entire pavilion.

Immediately everything dissolved into chaos. People screamed and dashed for the exit. Ylena threw herself out of the way of Vali’s violent powers.

“Valerine! Stop them!” her father shouted.

“I’m sorry! How do I put them back into my hands?”

“Concentrate on your powers drawing back!”

Suddenly they stopped. All of the children were frozen, standing there, and Ylena lay unconscious, scorched, on the wet ground.

“You have such strong powers,” her father stated. “You must get out of here so they don’t find you.”

Vali knew that she should get out. People deemed “dangerous” by the magic ministers were chased down and imprisoned—or worse.

“I will,” Vali whispered. “I love you, dad.” She embraced him with all her might. “I promise to see you again some day.”

As soon as she let go, she ran to Tessa. “Goodbye.”

“Stay away from me!” Tessa shrieked, dashing away down the steps. She burst into tears.

Vali stood there, hurt. Being rejected by a close friend stung. But leaving Diamond City, the only home she’d ever known, was going to sting even worse.

Review of The City of Ember, by Jeanne DuPrau

Lina is an artistic girl that lives in the city of Ember, going about her normal life as twelve-year olds do in the city, working at her newly assigned job.

She lives at home with her Granny and her baby sister Poppy. All is well, until the city of Ember takes a turn for the worse.

Only when the blackouts begin happening, more and more frequently, Lina decides that something should be done. She knows that Ember won’t last forever, and she believes there’s another city, at least in her mind, out there somewhere . . .

When she finds a document of mysterious instructions, she knows it means something. So with the help of her friend, Doon, they decipher the instructions, bit by bit, in hope of escape.

Rating: 4/5 stars. This book was interesting and made me think: could there possibly be a city like this constructed in the future? I liked Lina as a character and how determined and curious she was. However, the book was boring at the beginning for me, though you might think differently! I am definitely the type for fast paced stories. Also, I felt that the story didn’t tie up some loose ends that I was curious about.

Ages: 9-13. I would definitely reccomend this book to younger readers.

Short Poems

a fountain pen propped upward on a stack of papers

These are a collection of short poems I’ve written over the years. Some of them were written a couple years ago, some were more recent. Enjoy!


HOME

In a clearing of crowded trees stands a home.

There is a fire burning in the fireplace, beckoning you.

The snowflakes are falling slowly outside.

Little cousins play, making snow angels.

The adults are sipping cider in the kitchen.

And a happy teen, lying in her bed.

Her home is where her soul belongs.

If only all homes were like this, warm and inviting,

thinks a sad little boy in the woods, frost biting his nose.

ON FRIDAY THE THIRTEENTH . . .

A clatter, a crash, it’s suddenly cold.

The walls are closing in.

An owl hoots, a wolf howls,

the night is pitch black, but it’s only four in the evening!

I am frightened . . . I refuse to be home alone again.


These ones were written for a writing prompt. You were given two words, and you were supposed to write a poem about each. Mine were home and scary.


BUBBLES

Blow a bubble into the sky,

you hope it goes where mermaids cry,

you hope it goes where no one dies,

you hope it goes where nobody lies.

Blow a bubble into the sky,

but, alas, it goes as far as I.

POP!

SPRING

Petals falling softly down,

vibrant colors all around.

Springtime, suntime, flowers dance,

slowly dipping in a trance.     

Sunshine, birdsong floating ‘round,

singing, buzzing, sweet spring sounds.


These are my happiest poems (so far). You always need to have some happy poetry in there!


DARK TO LIGHT

Reaching aimlessly through the dark,

in this blackness there’s not even a spark.

Racing quickly towards the light,

running, beginning, starting my fight.

Please consume me, I silently say.

Make all this night go away.

Turn me into golden rays,

turn me into brilliance, day.

Like a moth to the flame,

a frightening, very dangerous game.

Flying away into the night,

hoping one day there will be light.

When the day comes that I reach the sun,

nevermore will I have to run.


This is one of my sadder/darker ones, and I like how it could mean anything. It could symbolize struggles with depression, anxiety, death, sickness, or any other thing like that.


FIGHTING FOR LOVE

Fighting with their lives on the edge,

trying to capture the miracle that will save.

United hearts pound, echoing eternal.

Everything has been hurt, mud, dirt, blood.

The faces turn straight toward the danger.

Their minds flash, seeing their family, friends, future, past.

Souls, remembering everything.

They fight for love.


This one actually one a writing contest. So I decided to save best for last!

Thanks for reading!

The Girl Who Could Unite Them All, Part Two

girl in white sweater in front of a purple background

The woman and Vali walked through the pavilion, eventually ending up on a stage with many other twelve-year olds, people Vali’s own age. The woman walked off, scribbling on her clipboard.

“Hi, Vali!” a voice said behind her.

Vali turned around to see one of her schoolmates, Tira. “Hi!”

Tira was dressed in a nice blue tank top matched with a lacy white skirt. “Are you excited for the Awakening?” she squealed.

“Of course!” Vali exclaimed.

“A flame, huh? I could see you as one,” Tira commented.

“And I could see you as an aquatic,” said Vali.

They chatted about their lives and what had been going on since Friday afternoon.

Finally they were shushed by the tapping of a microphone. A tall and beautiful woman, one of the magic ministers, Ylena, was standing in front of all of them. “Greetings, people of Diamond City and Lorian. Today is a very special occasion.”

There was enthusiastic applause from the audience.

Vali beamed, pain shooting through her hands.

“Each one of these children will have their powers Awakened this morning.”

There was more applause.

“Now,” Ylena said, her eyes glinting with pride. “Each of you line up.”

Vali and Tira lined up next to each other, and Vali was pleased to know they were each near the front.

The first person to go was a small boy with large brown eyes. Ylena grabbed his hands and immediately after his hair turned blue. “Samson Hale, aquatic!” Ylena announced.

Next was a red haired, freckled girl. Ylena took her hands and then her hair turned a deeper, darker, cherry color.

“Blair Lize, flame!” Ylena said.

Three other people went after them, and then it was suddenly Tira’s turn. Ylena took Tira’s hands, and then her hair turned blue.

“Tira Preslyn, aquatic!”

Vali politely clapped along with everyone. Her hands burned.

It was now her turn. The moment she’d been waiting for. She stepped up to Ylena.

Ylena took her hands. Her heart pounded.

A second passed, and then gasping erupted from the audience. Vali’s heart pounded. What was wrong?

Ylena stepped back, confusion, terror, and surprise flickering across her face.

“What’s wrong?” Vali asked. “What’s happening?”

“Vali!” Tira shouted from the very end of the line of children. “Your hair is purple.”

Review of “The Unwanteds” series, by Lisa McMann

two children fleeing from a winged giant cat

 

“The Unwanteds” was a very entertaining series, and I had a fun time reading the books.

Alex lives in Quill, a land that hates and fears creativity of any kind. On a specific day every year, Quillens celebrate the Purge. The Purge is a holiday that separates out the thirteen-year olds of their country, picking out the Wanteds (the people designated to be the future leaders of Quill and who have some life in them), the Necessaries (the people to keep the population of Quill alive and are drab and lifeless), and the Unwanteds (the creative people who will be sent to their death. I know, morbid, right?).

Alex, unfortunately, is deemed Unwanted, whereas his identical twin brother, Aaron, is a Wanted. Alex is sent away to be killed, to the place where they end the Unwanteds, the Death Farm, but miraculously, he doesn’t die! He is sent to a magical world called Artimé by the Death Farmer, a mage named Marcus Today.

Alex befriends other Unwanteds named Lani, Samheed, and Meghan, and together they make dicoveries, learn magic, and go on adventures.

Rating: 4/5 stars. The issues I found with this series were that 1) it was too romantic (at least for me, but if you like romance you’d love it), 2) the battle scenes (especially the one in the last book) were way too long, and 3) I found that the plot line got a little bit repetitive in the final books. Other than that, it was good. This series was great, but I’m hard to please when it comes to books.

Ages: 12-15